Glossary

Tags

Code
This refers to the coding of products and websites, specifically semantic markup, ARIA, HTML, CSS, and other relevant front-end technology.
Cognitive
This refers to a diversity of cognitive disabilities and can also encompass neurodivergent, intellectually disabled, and developmentally disabled needs. Access in this category usually pertains to making things easy to understand and providing support when needed.
Content
This refers to the creation and editing of content, which includes images, video, audio, and text.
Defined in Markup
Under the umbrella tag of code, this refers specifically to making elements clearly defined in markup (the HTML) so that relevant information is available to assistive tech, such as screen readers. In WCAG, this is referred to as programmatically determined.
Design
This refers to the design of products and websites, including styles, navigation, usability, and user experience.
Error Recovery
Under the umbrella tag of design, this refers to making sure people can understand errors, how to fix them, and how to prevent them in the future.
Hearing
This refers to Deaf and Hard of Hearing needs - mainly making sure that audio is not the only format for sharing content. Access needs include transcripts, closed captions, and descriptions of audio.
Interaction
Under the umbrella tag of code, this refers specifically to user interaction with the interface, including keyboard, touch (such as on mobile or tablet), relevant animations, and usability. It's important that interactions are accessible to people with visual and physical disabilities.
Keyboard
Under the umbrella tag of code, this refers to accessibility of a keyboard interface, which users may primarily or solely use if they do not use a mouse (often those with physical disabilities).
Level A
This refers to WCAG 2.1 compliance level A, which addresses access barriers that make it impossible or extremely difficult for disabled people to interact with something.
Level AA
This refers to WCAG 2.1 compliance level AA, which significantly improves the accessibility experience. This is the typical standard for government institutions and legal mandates.
Level AAA
This refers to WCAG 2.1 compliance level AAA, which describes an optimal level of care and attention paid toward access needs.
Multimedia
Under the umbrella tag of content, this refers specifically to time-based media such as movies and livestreams. It's important that this content is accessible to Blind, Deaf, and Deaf-Blind audiences.
Navigation
Under the umbrella tag of design, this refers specifically to the organization and usability of navigation (how someone finds things and goes to different pages).
Physical
This refers to a diversity of physical disabilities, which affect body and movement. Access for physical disabilities usually pertain to making things easy to interact with, have patient timing, and allow for error recovery.
Presentation
Under the umbrella tag of code, this refers to the visual presentation -specifically making sure that people can zoom in one things, change the size of the browser or screen, enlarge the text, etc. and still be able to see and understand everything.
States
Under the umbrella tag of code, this refers to the different states of interactive elements such as hover, focus, pressed, etc. It's important to define these states for keyboard interactivity.
Styles
Under the umbrella tag of design, this refers to visual styles, including color, typography, spacing, and iconography. It's important that the visual styles are accessible to people who are colorblind, dyslexic, have low vision, and/or other visual disabilities.
Timing
Under the umbrella tag of design, this refers specifically to supporting people through time-related tasks, such as time limits and time-out sessions. It's important to be supportive of people who may get distracted or take longer in doing something, such as people with ADHD.
Visual
This refers to the needs of Blind, visually impaired, colorblind and dyslexic people. Most access needs refer to screen reader and screen magnifier accessibility, as well as making sure that content is easy to see and customize.
Writing
Under the umbrella tag of content, this refers specifically to making text content is easy to read and understand. It's important that this is accessible to people with cognitive and learning disabilities as well as people who come from a different language or class background.

Other Terms

ASL

American Sign Language

Authenticate

In technology, authentication refers to being able to log into your unique user account, usually with your email and password.

CSS

(Cascading Style Sheets) is a computer programming language used for visual styles of websites. It changes settings such as color, typography, and spacing.

Focus

This is a state of an interactive element (such as a button) that lets you know that it is ready to receive input. It's essential for keyboard and and screen reader users.

HTML

(HyperText Markup Language) is the standard markup language for documents designed to be displayed in a web browser (such as Chrome).

Hover

This is a state of an interactive element (such as a button) that lets you know that it is interactive, usually with a different color or shadow

Markup

In technology, markup is a computer programming language that uses tags to define elements within a page. HTML is an example of markup.

Navigation

In technology, this refers to the process of organizing links so that they are easy to find and understand.

Path-based gesture

An interactive gesture that requires precise movement, such as drag and drop or pinch to zoom

Responsive

In technology, this refers to the ability of a website to respond to different screen sizes and devices, such as a computer screen vs. a phone screen.

Screen reader

A type of assistive technology that converts text, buttons, and other screen elements to audio and/or braille, used primarily by Blind and visually impaired people.

Transcript

A complete recording of audio content in written text format

UI

User interface

UX

User Experience